David Berg Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls

image We are delighted to tell you that the David Berg Foundation, a long time generous supporter of educational and cultural projects in the U.S. and in Israel, will establish the David Berg National Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls in our Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel. The David Berg National Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls will be the leading library in the world for Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran studies. It will be home to all publications relating to the Dead Sea Scrolls and the site of Qumran, and provide easy access to all archival and source materials relating to the archaeological excavations of Qumran, exhibitions of the Dead Sea Scrolls, conservation and preservation of the Scrolls, the Dead Sea Scrolls Digitization project and the publication of the Dead Sea Scrolls. In addition, the David Berg National Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls will provide direct access for researchers to the original 1950's negatives and to hi-resolution images of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

imageThe design plan for the library includes a combination of open access and closed book compactors, reader spaces, seating areas and a number of study cubicles. The David Berg National Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls will be located in the southern wing of the first floor of the National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel, providing stunning views of the Hebrew University Campus and Mount Herzl. In its new and accessible home and light filled space, designed by Architect Moshe Safdie, the David Berg National Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls will be used extensively by students from all the universities in Israel, Israeli and visiting foreign archaeologists and researchers, school children and anyone interested in the archaeology and history of the Land of Israel.

The Library for the Dead Sea Scrolls will be a wonderful asset in a magnificent building and a magnet and beacon for Israel and archaeological studies. It will become a central component of the Ingeborg and Ira Rennert World Center for the Dead Sea Scrolls which will also include the Bernard Osher Galleries, the Sandra and Leon Levine Education Wing and the National Viewable Conservation and Housing Centers. It will forever change the level and quality of Dead Sea Scrolls research and education in Israel and around the world.

The David Berg Foundation's fabulous gift joins a number of significant gifts from our many friends and supporters that are uniquely important towards realizing our goal, and together form the cornerstone of our efforts to reach out and educate the public about the rich and diverse archaeological heritage of the Land of Israel.

The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein National Campus for the Archaeology of Israel is a dramatic education, research and illumination complex being built by the Israel Antiquities Authority on Museum Hill in the center of Jerusalem. The National Campus, designed by Architect Moshe Safdie, will serve as the National Center for the research, study, conservation, restoration, housing, curation, publication, education, and illumination of the archaeological material excavated in Israel, and will enhance conservation and preservation of the National Treasures for future generations of scholars, students and the general public.

This unprecedented undertaking by the Israel Antiquities Authority - the preeminent organization in the fields of Israeli and Biblical Archaeology - will bring together nearly two million archaeological objects, among them 15,000 Dead Sea Scrolls, the largest and most comprehensive collection of Dead Sea Scrolls in the world, under one roof in the center of Jerusalem. One of the most important and fascinating features of the National Campus will be the viewable National Collections and Conservation Centers where the conservation and restoration of all archaeological material discovered in the country is carried out by IAA conservators and will be available to view by the public. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to assemble the priceless treasures that represent the cultural heritage of the Land of Israel and make them accessible and available to the public in a 220,000 square foot building on Museum Hill across from the Knesset.

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